Are Psychotherapy and Counselling Really More Regulated Than Coaching? The Truth That Might Surprise You

Author : Nick Bolton

17th November 2018

We’re often asked about the regulation of coaching and whether it’s likely to be regulated in the future. Around this question, we often also hear the assumption that psychotherapy and counselling are regulated and that this seems to make coaching less credible…

So, here’s a surprising truth:

Neither psychotherapy nor counselling is regulated.

This can come as a surprise to many and we sometimes face vociferous insistence that these practices are indeed regulated and that coaching is the only unregulated practice.

So let’s get clear.

It’s indicative that such confusion still exists so many decades after professions like psychotherapy etc came in to being. We often assume that something is a regulated profession with a title such a psychotherapist protected and useable only by qualified individuals.

This is more often than not an assumption mistakenly believed even by those in the profession and typically it’s the result of effective self-regulation.

This is the case with all three of counselling, psychotherapy and coaching.

Whilst the specific combination of “registered psychotherapist” is protected (to avoid blatant and outright deception), the word “psychotherapist” by itself isn’t. The reality is that anyone can claim to be a coach, counsellor or psychotherapist with little or no training and be perfectly entitled to do so. We might not like that fact but it remains the reality. These terms are unprotected and anyone can adopt them whenever they want.

For many, particularly considering the vulnerability of people who might present in psychotherapy, this is a major concern – for instance, see Amanda Williamson Counselling and Unsafe Spaces

The UKCP itself says: “Therapists do not have to register with UKCP or any other organisation, which means that anyone can call themselves a psychotherapist.” For the full article go to,
https://www.psychotherapy.org.uk/registers-standards/about-our-register/

Now for the good news!

In all three areas of practice, robust self-regulation and accreditation has been developed to mark out well-trained practitioners who abide by particular codes of ethics and behaviour. On the counselling and psychotherapy side, the well-established UKCP and BACP provide oversight, and on the coaching side, the ICF and Association for Coaching provide similar quality assurance. And there are plenty of other specialist professional bodies on both sides – perhaps part of the problem!

To be recognised as an accredited psychotherapist, counsellor or coach, you’ll undergo coach training or a psychotherapy/counselling qualification and join such a body. You will have to meet their rigorous criteria for accreditation and, by doing so, you will be considered an accredited coach or therapist.  To be clear though, and to risk repeating myself, these are self-managing bodies and one professional body’s criteria can differ wildly from another.

Whilst none of this stops anyone just setting up as coach or therapist and adopting the title, it does give the public and clients the ability to distinguish between the trained professionals and the self-taught, who might lack the rigour, ethical frameworks and effectiveness of the accredited individuals.

Of course, ultimately training and qualification is about skill development and whilst accreditation might be a must for some, it all starts with being the most effective coach or therapist you can be.

It can be a surprise to find out that such impactful and trust-imbued practices are free for anyone to practise but the question we each need to address is “who do I want to be as a coach?” – the professional accredited practitioner or the self-styled untrained amateur.

The fact that you’re reading this would imply this matters to you and that you understand the growing importance of accreditation within these professions, even where, legally, it is not a statutory requirement.

Should you wish to find out more about the Animas approach to coach training, why not attend a free introduction to transformational coaching where we’ll discuss all this and more.

Categories: Coaching explained  

What's new?

Executive Coaching in a Nutshell: What You Need to Know to Decide if it's for You

Executive Coaching in a Nutshell: What You Need to Know to Decide if it's for You

Becoming a coach

The popularity of coaching as an approach to personal and professional development and change continues to grow, and this comes as little surprise to us. As a transformational coaching school we know the power of coaching as a means for transformation, and it would seem we are not the only…

Categories: Becoming a coach, Uncategorised, Working as a coach

Read More

Journeying into the Unknown: An Exploration of the Uncharted Waters to Becoming a CEO - Robert Stephenson

Journeying into the Unknown: An Exploration of the Uncharted Waters to Becoming a CEO - Robert Stephenson

In this brilliant lecture, our very own Robert Stephenson shares his experience of becoming a CEO. Mapping his journey with personal stories and insights, Robert explores how we can become the CEO of our own lives and the captains of our own ships to enable us to prepare for unseen…

View

S4 E4: Georgie Nightingall - Transformational Conversations, Talking with Strangers and TedX

S4 E4: Georgie Nightingall - Transformational Conversations, Talking with Strangers and TedX

In the latest instalment of the Animas Podcast, life coach, entrepreneur and founder of unique events business Trigger Conversations, Georgie Nightingall, talks about her work around getting people to have more meaningful conversations and move away from the repetitive mundanities of questions such as "What do you do?" Georgie also…

View